CASA seeks to understand how to create an integrated service delivering a personalised set of enabling products designed to meet existent or future individual desires and aspirations. The project has ended and ran from January-September 2014. See:  publications

Completed project.

Connecting Assistive Solutions to Aspirations (CASA) is a UK-based Technology Strategy Board (TSB) Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI) funded project, within the pdfTSB's Long-Term Care Revolution research programme. The project as a whole is a collaboration with MindTech researchers at the University of Nottingham, the University of West England in Bristol; companies Sensixa and Leone Services Ltd; and Swiss Cottage School, Development & Research Centre. The Nottingham arm of CASA's research is organised by Professor Tom Dening and Dr Michael Craven with Research Assistant Maria Laura De Filippis.

CASA's aims are to investigate how to combine existing and new technologies in into packages, working out how they might better fit with people's physical surroundings, social networks and desired lifestyles, to produce an affordable contemporary lifestyle product. A priority in CASA is to ensure a person-centric approach to the design and implementation of enabling products and services, towards understanding how to create an experience that focuses on desires and aspirations of the end-user and their support circle. CASA as a whole will involve three populations: adults over 65 years old and their formal and informal social networks; family carers of older adults with dementia living in the community; and younger people with learning disabilities living in the community who are recent school leavers or who are soon to be leaving school. The Nottingham arm of the project will comprise the second of these three groups, i.e. carers of people with dementia.

Dementia is one of the most important issues we face as the population ages. There are estimated to be over 750,000 people in the UK with dementia and numbers are expected to double in the next thirty years. The term 'dementia' is used to describe a syndrome which may be caused by a number of illnesses in which there is progressive decline in multiple areas of function. Although dementia is primarily a condition associated with older people, there are also a significant number of people (currently around 15,000) who develop dementia earlier in life. Direct costs of dementia to the NHS and Social Care are in the region of £8.2bn annually. A key quality outcome identified through consultation with people with dementia and carers, and included in the development of the National Dementia Strategy is, 'I can enjoy life' such that 'People living with dementia will be well supported in all aspects of living with dementia, leaving them confident to lead as full and active life as possible. They will be able to pursue the activities (including work) that allow them to be happy and feel fulfilled while living with dementia.' (Quality outcomes for people with dementia: building on the work of the National Dementia Strategy (DH, 2010).

Publications:

De Filippis ML, Craven MP, Dening T. (2017) Preferences of Informal Carers on Technology Packages to Support Meal Production by People Living with Dementia, Elicited from Personalised AT and ICT Product Brochures. Informatics, 4(1),1;Special issue: Smart Health 2016. doi: 10.3390/informatics4010001

Craven MP, De Filippis ML, Dening T. (2014) Quality of Life Tools to Inform Co-design in the Development of Assistive Technologies for People with Dementia and their Carers, in Pecchia et al. (Eds.). Ambient Assisted Living and Daily Activities, Lecture Notes in Computer Science Volume 8868, 2014, pp. 394-397 (6th International Work-Conference, IWAAL 2014, Belfast, UK, December 2-5, 2014. Proceedings). Available at doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-13105-4_57

De Filippis ML, Craven MP, Dening T. (2014) Informal carer role in the personalisation of assistive solutions connected to aspirations of people with dementia, in Pecchia et al. (Eds.). Ambient Assisted Living and Daily Activities, Lecture Notes in Computer Science Volume 8868, 2014, pp. 236-243 (6th International Work-Conference, IWAAL 2014, Belfast, UK, December 2-5, 2014. Proceedings). Available at doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-13105-4_35

Join MindTech (click)

We would love to keep in touch with you regarding our work and how you might be able to help. Please fill in this form so we can contact you.

Have you had your say yet? Tell us your top 3 research questions about digital for mental health… https://t.co/5IVZ929SuE

What if tech tried to be healing instead of just addictive? Interesting article about designing wellbeing into tech https://t.co/yOlYVF6f2v